Autonomous vehicles pick up pace as Coronavirus forces people to stay indoors

While health agencies and global organizations scramble for resources in healthcare and try to minimize human contact, autonomous vehicles have played a major role in averting the crisis and helping automate ground-level tasks for agencies.

Autonomous vehicles pick up pace as Coronavirus forces people to stay indoors
Autonomous vehicles pick up pace as Coronavirus forces people to stay indoors

Autonomous vehicles pick up pace as Coronavirus forces people to stay indoors

Self-driving cars have been a far fetched fantasy and have been seen in space opera for most of our lives. Today, as technology advances and Elon Musk becomes a youth icon, self-driving cars are no longer a whimsical idea. 

Self-driving cars, or autonomous vehicles in general, have picked up pace in the last few years. What has pushed the testing and use of these vehicles to the next level is humans being forced to stay inside. 

Yes, it really took a global pandemic to realize the value autonomous vehicles can bring to society. What was previously considered unsafe and unpredictable is now being deployed at scale to help essential workers, deliver goods to the elderly, and so much more. 

While health agencies and global organizations scramble for resources in healthcare and try to minimize human contact, autonomous vehicles have played a major role in averting the crisis and helping automate ground-level tasks for agencies. 

For example, China has deployed autonomous vehicles for a number of uses during COVID-19. Self-driving vehicles are being used to deliver food to hospitals, clean the roads, and also delivering medicines and food to the elderly and differently-abled. One of the most innovative uses of a self-driving autonomous vehicle in China was witnessed when a self-driving robot was used to disinfect hospitals. The ability to reduce human contact and perform tasks that help save energy, time, and money has been one of the great things autonomous vehicles are being used for.

Today, all the money spent on research and development of self-driving cars seems worth it. 

A fear of autonomous technology has prevailed for a long time. Especially with self-driving cars that can cause a lot of damage, people have always been skeptical about their use and the extent of dependence on them. 

There has been a shift in the perceptions of people. While previously, almost two-thirds of Americans were concerned about self-driving cars and autonomous vehicles, the numbers are set to reduce with the onset of Coronavirus.

Human-free delivery services have been deployed in many parts of the world, especially China, to encourage social isolation and distancing. Companies that are working in the domain of autonomous vehicles stand a huge chance of coming out of the COVID-19 crisis stronger and more trusted. Many companies have taken on themselves to provide pro-bono services to help fight the pandemic.

In a time where humans are a biohazard, autonomous vehicles and technology have a shot at becoming the norm. As proven in research and tests, removing the human driver from a vehicle makes it much safer since the risk of driving under the influence, miscalculations, and accidents are minimized. We’re still waiting to see how the Coronavirus really affects the industry, but it is for sure that it will.