Battling Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS

With a high potential for becoming a global epidemic, the 2019 Novel Coronavirus is being tracked by bodies like the US Center for Disease Control and WHO. It is a time in history where disease control and management through technology can become a matter of life and death. Find Out More:

Battling Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS
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Battling Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS

On January 30th 2020, the World Health Organisation declared a global emergency for the Chinese epidemic is spreading across the world. Coronavirus, which started in the city of Wuhan in China has been spreading like wildfire, and the toll of infected people is rising rapidly. Governments and people are devising new ways of tackling the problem as the communicable disease spreads.

While industries use technology to improve processes and bring efficiency at scale, this health emergency is heavily reliant on analytics and GIS to ensure the safety of people. With health organisations and government bodies deploying GIS and analytics to track and study the spread of this fatal virus, the use of technology in global health management has taken to headlines. 

With a high potential for becoming a global epidemic, the 2019 Novel Coronavirus is being tracked by bodies like the US Center for Disease Control and WHO. It is a time in history where disease control and management through technology can become a matter of life and death. Technology has proven to be a lifesaver in these trying times.

John Hopkins University has created a real-time visualisation of the epidemic that includes a map, total number of cases, deaths, and number of people recovering. The comprehensive system monitors the outbreak consistently and also provides country-wise data of infected people, the number of cases by region, and much more complex information.

Also Read: This Map Tracks Coronavirus Global Cases in Near Real-Time

Mapping of this data has helped generate awareness of the outbreak in the general public. The data sources include the CDC’s and WHO’s data. The combined information helps plan contingency steps, formulate emergency plans, and even predict the pattern of the epidemic. The data has helped immensely in planning resources for tackling the disease.

Analytics through Artificial Intelligence and machine learning has helped identify patterns that have facilitated the prediction of future spread and outbreak. Even suspected cases globally can be monitored through local physicians and creating and utilising millions of data points across the globe. Government agencies are rapidly confirming remote cases through data management and analytics. People who have been travelling are also being tagged and tested, thanks to an extensive travel database available at ease. 

Predictive analytics is being applied to public places and health institutions to identify spread patterns of the Coronavirus. Hospitals, airports, and public places are being scanned, and data is being collected across various platforms to find and tackle the disease. These systems and technologies are being deployed in public places for operations management and control of disease spread. 

For example, if a hospital predicts 100 potential cases coming in for the virus, it might have to reallocate resources and reschedule aspects like surgery across their departments.

While these technologies are not directly contributing to the control of the virus spread, they are making data management and analysis easier at a global scale to control, prevent, and reduce the impact of the outbreak.