ClearSpace SA to head ESA’s first debris removal mission worth EUR 100 million

The ClearSpace One mission will capture the discarded VESPA upper stage (VEga Secondary Payload Adapter) from a rocket launched in 2013 and guide it into the Earth’s atmosphere.

ClearSpace SA to head ESA’s first debris removal mission worth EUR 100 million
ClearSpace SA to head ESA’s first debris removal mission worth EUR 100 million

ClearSpace SA to head ESA’s first debris removal mission worth EUR 100 million

Space debris has been a cause of concern since long. Fortunately, a Swiss “disposal satellite” will now begin the work of removing debris from space for the first time. As mentioned in maxon’s corporate blog, The ClearSpace One mission, which is planned for 2025, will capture the discarded VESPA upper stage (VEga Secondary Payload Adapter) from a rocket launched in 2013 and guide it into the Earth’s atmosphere.

The mission, which is part of the EUR 100 million space debris removal project by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be directed by ClearSpace SA. The engineering knowledge that the researchers at the EPFL Space Center, Switzerland have gained while working on space debris capture systems since 2010 has gone into the development of ClearSpace One. ClearSpace SA began its operations in the maxon lab at the EPFL.

Luc Piguet, CEO and cofounder of ClearSpace SA shares through blog, “The maxon lab is a hub for technology transfer, making it ideal for start-ups.”

It is quite an achievement for a start-up to get selected for a EUR 100 million project. Luc Piguet shares via the blog, “Although we had great confidence in the application we submitted, we were surprised to be allowed to take the lead over a project consortium on our own. We’ve taken economic considerations into account right from the beginning. The costs incurred by each de-orbit should be as low as possible. This won over the ESA. We’re taking on a big responsibility.”