GHGSat launches its first greenhouse gas detecting satellite

Amongst the new constellation of satellites, Iris is the first satellite that utilizes patented technology to detect emissions from sources 100 times smaller than the other satellite system, and with a resolution 100 times higher.

GHGSat launches its first greenhouse gas detecting satellite
GHGSat launches its first greenhouse gas detecting satellite

GHGSat launches its first greenhouse gas detecting satellite

GHGSat recently announced that they have successfully launched their latest satellite ‘Iris’. Over the course of next week, the GHGSat’s team will execute a series of procedures to commission the satellite and make it operational to its fullest potential.

Amongst the new constellation of satellites, Iris is the first satellite that utilizes patented technology to detect emissions from sources 100 times smaller than the other satellite system, and with a resolution 100 times higher.

This suggests GHGSat can image and identify methane emissions from point sources as small as individual oil & gas wells. No other commercial operator or state-funded space organisation can operationally do make that happen.

GHGSat’s data and proprietary analytics enable regulators and operators in sectors like oil and gas, waste management, mining, energy and agriculture to accurately and cost-effectively track emissions, and take prompt action to repair faulty infrastructure.

This capability is going to be further enhanced when the company’s third satellite, ‘Hugo’ launches later this year. By the top of 2022, GHGSat plans to possess 10 high-resolution spacecraft in orbit, and to be the worldwide reference for greenhouse emissions monitoring from space.