Indian Ministry of Electronics and IT to award tenders for 10 lakh NavIC Chips to highest bidder

The request for proposal (RFP) was floated by MeitY on November 30, to not only provide impetus to India’s indigenous positioning technology NavIC, but also strengthen signal availability and position accuracy all over the country. NavIC, or the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, can provide accurate position information service to users in India, as well as the region extending up to 1,500 kilometers from its boundary.

Indian Ministry of Electronics and IT to award tenders for 10 lakh NavIC Chips to highest bidder
Indian Ministry of Electronics and IT to award tenders for 10 lakh NavIC Chips to highest bidder

Indian Ministry of Electronics and IT to award tenders for 10 lakh NavIC Chips to highest bidder

Following pre-bid meetings on December 14, high-stakes bidding is now on for tenders for 10 lakh integrated NavIC and GPS receivers in India, to be submitted to the Ministry of Electronics and IT, by January 11. Proposals can be submitted for the design, manufacturing, supply, and maintenance of the receivers.

The request for proposal (RFP) was floated by MeitY on November 30, to not only provide impetus to India’s indigenous positioning technology NavIC, but also strengthen signal availability and position accuracy all over the country. NavIC, or the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, can provide accurate position information service to users in India, as well as the region extending up to 1,500 kilometers from its boundary.

In contrast to GPS-only receiver chips, the commercialization of NavIC user receivers will support a range of messaging facilities. This would also reduce India’s reliance on foreign positioning technology and strengthen its positioning autonomy at critical times of need, as the NavIC system is completely under Indian control.

The government hopes to use these receivers for navigation on land, air, and water, disaster management, vehicle tracking, location services on mobile phones, and more.

Qualified bidders will also receive subsidies from the government, and companies can form a consortium to deliver on the proposals in three phases:

  • Development phase: Each bidder would need to design and develop a proof of concept within 14 months, to be evaluated and approved by the ISRO. Bidders will then have four more months to test and demonstrate the commercial readiness of the receivers.
  • Implementation phase: Bidder(s) qualifying for this stage would need to consistently deploy 25% of the contract, or 2.5 lakh receivers, every six months, for a period of two years.
  • Support phase: In the third and final phase, the devices would need to be supported for three years from the date of sale.